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Learn more about UNICEF’s work under the topic "girls' rights".

How this harmful practice affects millions of girls worldwide.

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Through her studies in STEM - and with support from the UNICEF Techno Girl programme - Sebabatso is helping change her future and shape her community.

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A pandemic through a girl's eyes: 16 adolescent girls from nine countries film their lives under lockdown.

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A programme to end open defecation in Jharkhand ends up transforming gender roles, with female toilet builders tackling gender gaps and taking on menstrual hygiene management.

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Girls education is an important topic for many countries around the world. Low participation and lack of opportunities in the field of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) is often cited as one of main barriers to a fulfilling education for girls. Faced with this situation, UNICEF Bolivia has started several new programmes throughout 2019 to reduce the gender gap in these areas, ensuring that girls and young people can develop the skills they need for the world of tomorrow.

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Irene is 14 years old and in grade 7 – which in Uganda, where she lives, is unusual for girls her age. UNICEF supported programs in Uganda are helping to ensure that Irene and girls like her are able to stay in school longer, sparking positive change in the community.

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In 2014, the world witnessed the abduction of more than 276 school girls taken from their school in the town of Chibok, in northeastern Nigeria, triggering a massive solidarity movement on social media with celebrities calling on the governments of the world to act. We wanted to bring them back, to live their childhood as any child - any girl - should be entitled to. Yet, more than five years later, more than 100 of the “Chibok girls” are still missing. Worse, 110 more girls were abducted, and five lost their lives, in February 2018 in Dapchi, northeast Nigeria.

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In Shahrak e Mahajereen, a mountainous village in Afghanistan’s central highlands, 28-year old Suraya is passionate about transforming the lives of illiterate girls and women.


Violence and harassment affects millions of girls and women around the world with as many as 8 out of 10 having experienced abuse. Find out 5 things you can do to help end violence against girls and women.


It's International Women's Day! Girls’ education is one of the most powerful investments that can be made to help break cycles of poverty and violence. It can be a turning point for women’s empowerment and the long-term health, peace and prosperity of entire communities and countries.