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Learn more about UNICEF’s work under the topic "One Youth".

6 strategies for teens facing a new (temporary) normal.

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On November 20, youth activists from across Canada gathered in Toronto and collaborated on a letter from the future.


In 2019, UNICEF reached almost all corners of the globe – 190 countries to be exact – to help save children’s lives. To celebrate the end of the year – and the end of a decade – we’ve chosen 5 stories from at home and abroad, to showcase how the tireless work of UNICEF staff and the generous support of our donors enables us to defend the right to childhood, for every child.

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Foresight. I knew what the word meant; I am an English Literature major, after all. But I had never really thought of it in the context of the future of the world. That changed when I participated in UNICEF Canada’s Foresight Lab at the Women Deliver Conference.

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When your baby has a fever, you reach for a thermometer. The Canadian Index of Child and Youth Well-being is designed to function like a social policy “thermometer" - to measure and communicate how well Canadian children and youth are actually doing, as opposed to how well we think they are doing.


For me, being a U-Reporter is a dream opportunity that assures that my opinion doesn’t stay locked away in a closet, but is heard and taken into account at all levels: political, economic, environmental, cultural, in sports, etc. It is also a commitment towards my community.


I was born colonized but, like many other Indigenous youth, am on the journey of decolonizing and reconnecting to my community and culture.


There have been several instances in my life where I have experienced some form of bullying. However, I have mostly experienced exclusive bullying from friend groups throughout my life.


There is such stigma around mental health, so much that some parents even say “I’d rather have my kids going through leukemia than going through clinical depression.” Acknowledging firstly that mental health exists, as well as knowing it is as important as our physical health, if not more, is the first step towards raising awareness against such stigma.


There is such stigma around mental health, so much that some parents even say “I’d rather have my kids going through leukemia than going through clinical depression”. Acknowledging firstly that mental health exists, as well as knowing it is as important as our physical health, if not more, is the first step towards raising awareness against such stigma.