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Learn more about UNICEF’s work under the topic "Children Uprooted".

As a result of the Venezuela migrant crisis, an estimated 1.1 million children –  including children uprooted from Venezuela, as well as returnees and those living in host and transit communities – will need protection and access to basic services across Latin America and the Caribbean in 2019, UNICEF said today[1].

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Half a million Rohingya children are stateless refugees in the Cox’s Bazar area in southern Bangladesh, increasingly anxious about their futures, and vulnerable to frustration and despair.

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A child under the age of 18 dies from violence every day in Honduras. For a country not engaged in active warfare, this figure is staggering.

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As families continue to migrate from northern Central America and Mexico, UNICEF is helping protect children along the way and addressing the circumstances that lead to their journeys.

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March 15 marks the 8th year-mark of the war in Syria. There are now millions of children living in Syria, and in neighboring countries, who have never known anything but war. This photo series takes you through the memories of Syrian children – now living in Za’atari Refugee Camp – and the objects they brought with them that encapsulate those memories.

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Over the past three years, the economic crisis in Venezuela has led hundreds of thousands of children and adolescents to leave the country with their families to migrate to other countries in the region, mostly to Peru and Colombia. They set out on the journey in difficult conditions and weary of the discrimination and xenophobia they might face in some places along the way.

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16 year old Yar came to Uganda from South Sudan three years ago. Although she had to leave everything behind, she has now made new friends – and a new life – for herself.


There has been a lot of ongoing debates lately around migration. But why is it on the news and what is the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration everyone is talking about? What does it mean for children refugees and migrants, and their rights and protection? Here are five things you need to know about what is happening in Marrakech this week.


Young migrants are full of potential. When they’re supported they can become agents of positive change for safe migration, equality and friendship. For Migration Week, UNICEF Canada looks at how everyday objects play a role in telling young migrant’s stories.


Pervasive violence and poverty drive desperate Central Americans to migrate in search of safety and a better life. UNICEF works with governments and local partners to improve conditions in their home countries.